SEC Charges Houston Businessman and Talk Radio "Money Man" for Fraudulent Conduct at Advisory Firm

Washington, D.C., March 25, 2011 — The Securities and Exchange Commission today charged Houston-area businessman Daniel Frishberg with fraudulent conduct in connection with promissory note offerings made to clients of his investment advisory firm.

The SEC alleges that Frishberg's firm Daniel Frishberg Financial Services (DFFS) advised clients to invest in notes issued by Business Radio Networks (BizRadio), a media company founded by Frishberg where he hosts his own show under the nickname "The MoneyMan." Frishberg failed to tell his clients about BizRadio's poor financial condition or his significant conflicts of interest with the note offerings that helped fund his salary at BizRadio.

Additional Materials

* SEC Complaint

Frishberg agreed to settle the SEC's charges by paying a $65,000 penalty that will be distributed to harmed investors. He will be barred from future association with any investment adviser.

"Contrary to his obligations as an investment adviser, Frishberg approved risky investment recommendations to his clients without ensuring that the risks and conflicts were properly disclosed," said Rose Romero, Director of the SEC's Fort Worth Regional Office. "Frishberg personally benefitted from the questionable investments that were recommended to his clients."

According to the SEC's complaint filed in federal district court in Houston, at least $11 million in promissory notes were issued by BizRadio and Kaleta Capital Management (KCM), which is owned by Frishberg's associate Albert Fase Kaleta. Frishberg and Kaleta jointly controlled BizRadio.

The SEC charged Kaleta and his firm with fraud in 2009, and the court appointed a receiver to marshal the assets of KCM and relief defendants BizRadio and DFFS.

The SEC alleges that Frishberg authorized Kaleta to recommend the notes to DFFS clients, and clients were not provided with critical disclosures. Investors were not told of BizRadio's poor financial condition and the likely inability of KCM and BizRadio to repay the notes. Nor were investors informed about Frishberg's significant conflicts of interest in the note offerings because the proceeds funded his salary as a BizRadio talk show host.

The SEC alleges that Frishberg chose Kaleta to recommend the BizRadio notes even though he was aware of complaints about Kaleta's lack of truthfulness in sales presentations regarding other investments.

The SEC's complaint alleges that Frishberg violated Section 206(2) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 and aided and abetted violations of Sections 206(1) and 206(2) of the Advisers Act.

Without admitting or denying the SEC's allegations, Frishberg consented to the entry of a permanent injunction against these violations and to pay a $65,000 penalty. Frishberg consented to the establishment of a fair fund for the distribution of his penalty to harmed investors, and agreed to be barred from association with any investment adviser or certain other registered entities.

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